SmokeJumping

May 27, 2009

What I Learned at 140 | The Twitter Conference (part 1)

Filed under: #140tc,Twitter — @smokejumper @ 4:25 am
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View this blog post “What I Learned at 140 | The Twitter Conference (part 1)” on my new blog site at SmokeJumperStrategy.com/blog.

Well I survived day one of the Twitter Conference (#140tc) at the Computer History Museum in Mtn View.  Some of many highlights:

  • 90%+ of the attendees pounding laptops furiously while speakers did their thing – a site for geek eyes
  • Seeing my first “webeletrity” (@ijustine) in person – now @GuyKawasaki has been relegated to some 50-year-old Hawaiian I happen to play pick-up ice hockey with
  • Witnessing @Scobleizer live – he’s taller but just as friendly and noteworthy as I imagined – I’m not sure why people are so obsessed with the size of his camera lens though
  • Meeting many cool and interesting people in person
  • Noting the irony of the first Twitter Conference in a building that used to be SGI and is now the Computer History Museum

I think I’ll go back for day two.

One of the day one highlights came early:  Alex Payne (@al3x), Twitter API lead was up first.

He noted how Jack Dorsey (@jack) truly recognized the power of “presence” in IM buddy lists and extended it into Twitter.  Interesting for me as an ex-AOLer to see how it took someone who wasn’t super close to the ICQ/AIM franchise (as far as I know) could see the opportunity and extend the seed of this idea into a new form.

I loved hearing Alex share how minimalism is a guiding design principle at Twitter.  Twitter looks remarkably similar today as Jan 2007. 

Twitter UI 01/2007

Twitter UI 01/2007

Alex is in a unique position to see what’s coming as he is actively working with external organizations that are developing applications on Twitter’s API’s.  Some of the things he sees coming:
One of the potentially biggest ideas he mentioned was that of a “portable identity.”  The major portals – AOL, Google, MSN and Yahoo! all have many years of efforts in building up their own user identity credentials that, in theory, travel around the Internet with a user unlocking a myriad of services as they go.  Facebook surely belongs with these firms as well now.  In the end, I’ve (perhaps cynically) viewed these efforts as self-serving.  The more one vendor is successful, the more they lock out their arch-rivals.  Without setting out to do so, Twitter may be actually be in a position to deliver some notion of truly portable identity.  Proof?  Well 10,000 applications built with their API’s to date is some evidence of momentum.
I’m sleepy . . . more later.
  1. The Power of Presence. Insights from Alex Payne, Twitter API Lead.
  2. I am a Twitter God(ess) and So Can You! The View From Twitter Stardom with @ijustine, @missrogue and @davepeck.
  3. Don’t Take the Drive to Manic Feature Explosion. What Makes a Good Twitter App.
  4. Twitter business start-ups are combination socialist and radical markets.   Twitter Strategies:  Real-World Success Stories.
  5. WTF, No Twitter TV!? Direction from Anamitra Banerji, Twitter Product Management.
  6. Even with a simple hash tag, there is a learning curve.   Soren MacBeth, Co-Founder / CEO of StockTwits.
  7. You can’t own social media. You can only interact with it. Corporate Use of Twitter by @JetBlue.
  8. Twitter will transform conferences & events. Surprising takeaways from an in-person Twitter conference experience.
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12 Comments »

  1. I didn’t realize that 10,000 applications are already out there. That in itself is a sign that twitter specifically and social networks in general are at the center of the new consumer behavior and human interaction. Not sure if that makes sense, but hopefully you know what i mean.

    Comment by Eran Even-Kesef — May 27, 2009 @ 12:30 pm | Reply

  2. Yes, I heard that # yesterday at the conference. Seems high – I wonder how long it would take one person to vet them all?! That aside, I agree that it demonstrates something significant is going on.

    Comment by @smokejumper — May 27, 2009 @ 2:14 pm | Reply

  3. […] The Power of Presence. Insights from Alex Payne, Twitter API Lead. […]

    Pingback by What I Learned at 140 | The Twitter Conference (round-up) : SmokeJumperStrategy — November 4, 2009 @ 8:35 pm | Reply

  4. […] The Power of Presence. Insights from Alex Payne, Twitter API Lead. […]

    Pingback by What I Learned at 140 | The Twitter Conference (part 8) : SmokeJumperStrategy — November 4, 2009 @ 8:37 pm | Reply

  5. […] The Power of Presence. Insights from Alex Payne, Twitter API Lead. […]

    Pingback by What I Learned at 140 | The Twitter Conference (part 7) : SmokeJumperStrategy — November 5, 2009 @ 4:36 am | Reply

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    Pingback by What I Learned at 140 | The Twitter Conference (part 6) : SmokeJumperStrategy — November 5, 2009 @ 4:38 am | Reply

  7. […] The Power of Presence. Insights from Alex Payne, Twitter API Lead. […]

    Pingback by What I Learned at 140 | The Twitter Conference (part 1) : SmokeJumperStrategy — November 10, 2009 @ 4:15 am | Reply

  8. […] The Power of Presence. Insights from Alex Payne, Twitter API Lead. […]

    Pingback by What I Learned at 140 | The Twitter Conference (part 5) : SmokeJumperStrategy — November 10, 2009 @ 5:34 am | Reply

  9. […] The Power of Presence. Insights from Alex Payne, Twitter API Lead. […]

    Pingback by What I Learned at 140 | The Twitter Conference (part 4) : SmokeJumperStrategy — November 13, 2009 @ 1:22 am | Reply

  10. […] The Power of Presence. Insights from Alex Payne, Twitter API Lead. […]

    Pingback by What I Learned at 140 | The Twitter Conference (part 3) : SmokeJumperStrategy — November 13, 2009 @ 1:25 am | Reply

  11. […] The Power of Presence. Insights from Alex Payne, Twitter API Lead. […]

    Pingback by What I Learned at 140 | The Twitter Conference (part 2) : SmokeJumperStrategy — November 13, 2009 @ 1:28 am | Reply


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